Tag Archives: knowledge transfer

IndiKon’s short visit to Munich

The Network for Science Management (Netzwerk Wissenschaftsmanagement) invited us to participate in their annual meeting which took place in Munich last week. The network aims to support the professionalization of administration through regular exchange of ideas and experiences and has, thus, a strong practical focus. Together with Isabel Welpe, Jutta Wollersheim, and Stefanie Ringelhan from the Chair of Strategy and Organization at TU Munich, I was invited to talk about the governance of academic cooperation from a scholarly standpoint.

The research group from Munich held an impressive talk about quantitative assessments of research productivity and possible performance paradoxes, the differing intensity of collaboration between PhD students of economics and among PhD students of management, and the possibilities of new forms of collaboration (e.g. crowd research), publication (e.g. open peer review and open access) and scholarly communication (e.g. web 2.0 applications). If I might say so, their research looks very interesting and especially their new ventures promise relevant insights.

After their talk, I presented the results of two studies which are currently under review for publication (fingers crossed). The studies approach the emerging actorhood of universities from a governance- and a resource-perspective. As already reported earlier, governance reforms in the early 2000s have strenthened managerial mechanisms and delegated decision-competencies to the upper echelons of universities, the president, vice-presidents, and chancellors. So we asked ourselves, whether the composition of this “top management team” has any influence on how successful the university is in acquiring competitive funding for large collaborative projects? The results suggest that socio-demographic diversity of decision-makers has positive effects on performance in that regard. The second study investigates the increasing professionalization of administration in specialized central support units. Results indicate that performance is not always enhanced by these developments. In some cases, voluntary collective action seems to be more important than support from such units. However, we’re currently gathering additional data and running further tests on our models, so the final results may be more rubust and provide further clarity.

There was broad consensus about the implications of the first study. Some were reminded of Niklas Luhmann who stated that complexity can only be reduced by complexity – a nice thought, indeed. The results of the second study were, not surprisingly, seen a little bit more controversial. I’m grateful for this opportunity to discuss our research with practitioners in the field (many thanks to Dr. Brauns from the Thuringian Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture).

Practitioner Cooperation

Hamburg University is currently implementing a new science infomation system. Next to personnel data, information on research grants, collaborative projects, publications, or patents will be systematically gathered and provided in one integrated system. Since both our research projects are concerned with the coordination of research collaborations and the analysis of potential, latent, and invisible collaboration networks (Invisible Colleges), we thought it would be a great idea to consult the project steering committee and see if we may contribute to the project. As expected, both sides had a lot of interesting and novel ideas to exchange. We’re very excited to be part of the project and, thus, will further intensify our cooperation.

2012 Conference on Entrepreneurial University in Münster, Germany – Impressions

During the last week of April a wide range of scholars from all around the world, as well as business leaders and policy makers from the european sphere, got together in Münster, Germany to present and dicuss their experiences and academic work regarding Entrepreneurial Universities, knowledge transfer and university, industry and government relations.

Valuable research and interesting projects and case studies were presented, discussed and reflected upon. In general, the main topics covered challenges, opportunities and best practices on entrepreneurial activities in Universities, entrepreneurial education, transfer and incubation projects, as well as management and leadership in higher education in the knowledge economy and the increasing role played by universities in national and regional economic development.

Overall, the main consensus stressed the need for encouraging an “entrepreneurial spirit” at all levels and all activities in our higher education institutions (HEI). Even though we have many european examples of successful knowledge transfer and entrepreneurship initiatives, as well as some “flagship” entrepreneurial universities, such as University of Tweente in the Netherlands; there was widespread agreement on the need to further work on the transformation and development of our european universities into more entrepreneurial organisations. European universities can learn and emulate many of the successful iniviatives from other regions, such as North America and Asian, which in general portrait a more developed “entrepreneurial culture” in their HIE.

If you want more detailed information about the conference, follow the link bellow to the web site. There you will find valuable information on the topics presented, keynote speeches, sponsoring organisations, etc. This link, lets you download the presentations from keynote speakers and conference participants

http://entrepreneurial-universities.com/

Finally, please follow up on updates on this blog or on their website regarding information about next year’s conference date and location.