Paper published: (Why) Do you trust your reviewers?

Our study on scholars’ attitudes towards academic journals’ peer-review has been published by Managementforschung (MF). Here’s the abstract: Peer review in academic publishing relies on the voluntary engagement of scholars who are, at best, committed to that practice. Current debates on peer review suggest that this commitment is diminishing. Conceptualizing peer Managementforschungreview as an instance of social exchange allows us to propose a conceptual model of commitment to peer review and test it by means of a structural equation analysis. Our empirical study is based on survey data from the social sciences (n = 359). Results show that authors are more committed to the practice of peer review if reviewers base their recommendations on rational arguments so that authors can trust them for their competence. By contrast, benevolent reviewers who try to collaborate with authors are not effective in fostering trust and commitment. Within the limitations of our data and with regard to reviewers’ behaviors and characteristics, we cannot support sweeping criticisms of the operational reliability of academic journals.

Access the article here: Hattke, F., Bögner, I., & Vogel, R. (in press): (Why) Do You Trust Your Reviewers? Influence Behaviors, Trustworthiness, and Commitment to Peer Review. Managementforschung (MF), 1-26.